CVIS

Imaging’s Role in Helping Earlier Detection of Cardio Complications in Cancer Treatment

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Imaging clinician examining cardiology imagesThe cancer survival rate tripled between 1971 and 2001, a testament to advancements in cancer detection and treatment. While this certainly is great news, aggressive treatment is not without risk. During the same time period, a noted increase in cardiovascular diseases among cancer survivors has been identified.

This increase threatens to offset some of the gains realized in cancer-related treatments. Early detection of cardiotoxicity is important to lessen the chance of having lasting cardiac effects during or after the cancer treatment.

 

Three Surprise Benefits of CVIS-EMR Interoperability

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A Cardiologist Enjoys Data Portability with CVIS InteroperabilityQuality cardiovascular care requires robust interoperability between the CVIS and EMR. In a value-based paradigm, it’s vital that patient information be freely available throughout the health system. Storing patient data in the EMR — automatically and in real time, preferably– means cardiologists have access to a broader view of patient health, and physicians in other departments can draw on cardiology data.

When the CVIS and EMR are fully interoperable, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. The following benefits are just a few examples of how interoperability and integration improve processes and patient experience.

 

Cardiology News: TAVR Approval Shows Promise for Cardiac Cath Labs

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Cardiology Imaging Specialist Reviews ImageTAVR Approval Shows Promise for Cardiac Cath Labs

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) expanded the indication for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in 2016 when it approved two TAVR devices for intermediate-risk aortic-stenosis patients.

It specifically targets patients with at least a 3% STS-predicted risk of dying within 30 days of surgery. The action followed the release, four months earlier, of intermediate-risk trial results that showed that TAVR was equal or superior to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR).

 

Nine years into specialized IT program, a cardiovascular department grows in the L.A. basin

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Northridge Hospital Medical CenterEditor’s Note: The following article by Dave Pearson is posted on imagingbiz.com and is reprinted here with permission.

A full year has gone by since 425-bed Northridge Hospital Medical Center in Los Angeles went live with a new enterprise-wide EMR solution from Cerner. The hospital likes what it’s seeing, but as capable as the system is for most departments, its cardiovascular reporting modules have not shown to be as versatile nor as precise as those in the McKesson CVIS, Northridge’s CardioVascular Center has been using since 2006.

 

Central Storage Critical to a Successful TAVR Program

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Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR)As transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) becomes more widely used across the US, TAVR specialists are realizing that the measurement method being used (CT angiography, transesophageal echocardiography, or traditional echocardiography) to determine the correct valve size is less important than storing those measurements in a central repository for later analysis.

With TAVR, a catheter is inserted in the groin and passed up to the heart (the procedure can also be done through the chest wall), avoiding the need for open-heart surgery. A replacement valve is compressed, advanced through the tube to the correct position within the aortic valve, and expanded. Some TAVR valves are mounted on a balloon to help with expansion; others are self-expanding.

 

Why A CVIS Can Bring Harmony to Hemodynamic Systems and the EHR

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CVIS, Cardiac imagingWhat makes a harmonious data relationship in cardiac imaging? All communications between cath labs and the EHR flow seamlessly, and new technologies are integrated swiftly without disruption. That flow is critical for cardiac providers to avoid duplicate data entries and burdensome manual processes when they file reports.

Cardiologists can establish such harmony in their department by integrating a centralized cardiovascular information system (CVIS) with hemodynamic systems and their EHR. Not only will this increase data processing efficiencies on the back end, it will also generate faster front-end workflows and meet emerging federal integration requirements.

 

What Makes A Complete Cardiac Imaging Solution?

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CVIS, Cardiac imaging futureThe cardiovascular service line has been rapidly evolving in the past several years, as new flavors of data and imagery are developed. This evolution has opened a significant opportunity for providers to consolidate their imaging and data efforts, rather than have them battle against each other within the service line.

Cardiac imaging providers can help with these interdepartmental data skirmishes by seeking a complete, centralized cardiovascular information system (CVIS). Unlike the image-centered focus of a cardiology PACS, a modern CVIS helps prioritize data integration within the entire service line.

 

3 Great Reasons to Integrate CVIS with VNA

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Integrating CVIS and VNAs help make health organizations a success.Whether you crave immediate results from IT investments or love to get ahead of a curve, we’ve got points for consideration on integrating your organization’s cardiovascular information system (CVIS) with your vendor neutral archive (VNA).

Let’s talk about the practical side of integration, the part where you get near-instant gratification. First, if your organization has purchased a VNA, you want to leverage that investment. Connecting the CVIS to the VNA creates opportunities for more efficient storage asset management and reduction in administrative overhead. Most VNA systems today offer image management capabilities that are superior to most CVIS systems. Put simply, it doesn’t make much sense to have a central image repository and store cardiology images in a separate system.

 

5 Reasons Why Cardiologists Should Use Social Media

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Cardiologists and Social MediaYou can’t avoid hearing about social media statistics. Whether they’re good (people using social media to support their health goals) or bad (people distracted while driving) it’s hard to miss the latest stats, including this one: the Pew Research Center found that 72 percent of U.S. adults used social media sites last year.

As physicians, that means that almost three-fourths of your patients are on social media. Are you missing out by not joining the social media bandwagon? If you’re thinking about doing so but aren’t sure how, there are sessions that cover social media and medicine at ACC.14. To learn about the why, read on for five good reasons to use social media.

 

Streamlining CVIS Workflow for Heart Patients of the Future

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Cardiologist With PatientWith the implementation of a cardiovascular information solution (CVIS), many cardiac units have experienced a drastic reduction in the amount of time their cardiologists have to spend doing tedious tasks. The collaboration between technology providers and cardiologists takes on added significance in light of a new report by The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) which reveals cardiologists will likely be under increased pressure from pediatric patients who are returning as adults.

Advances in Pediatric Heart Surgery